NEWS about the agency and the work our little stars have been performing can be viewed in a number of different places;

Below you will find our popular Blog that will keep you informed about various aspects of your membership, as well as tips and tricks about the industry and stories and experiences from our members.

Our Facebook feed to the right will link to the Bettina Facebook page. It provides 'real-time' updates on jobs and events as they occur...updated every day!

The Newsletters section provides a historical library of News as reported by the agency in the years gone by, prior to Facebook, Twitter and Blogs....ahhh, the good 'ol days!

You can also visit our external Blog 'Bettina Management Reviews' dedicated to the valued feedback from parents, children and clients.

Testimonials

Bettina Stories; Chelsea & Chloe Hall

Wednesday, August 24, 2016

Working with your sister isn't on the top of everyone's list of fun things to do, but these girls definitely make it work!

Non-identical twin sisters, Chloe & Chelsea, joined us in 2010. The bookings were slow to come in but once they did, they never stopped! The girls have taken on every job with a wide smile and a go-for-it attitude and the continue to make us proud every time they step in front of a client. As a family, the Hall's have been everything an agent could dream of, committed, passionate and flexible!

 

Age: 14yrs

Signed: 2010

Clients: Target, Kmart, Myer, Moose Toys, Russell Athletics, Aldi, Lincraft, Mattel Barbie, DPI Property Developers, Bayside Shopping Centre

 

How long have you been with the agency?

Chelsea: I've been with the agency for 6 years, so since I was 7 years old.

 

What made you want to get into modelling?

Chloe: I wanted to get into modelling because I've always wanted to see myself in a catalogue

 

What was it like going to your first casting?

Chelsea: I was really nervous going to my first casting but I was excited at the same time!

 

What do your friends say when they see you in catalogues or on TV?

Chloe: When my friends see me in a catalogue they say "OMG are you famous?"

 

What is the best part of working with your sister?

Chloe: It makes it easier because I know her which makes it more comfortable and we have a lot of fun on set

 

What things have you learnt from working in the modelling industry?

Chelsea: I've learnt to be friendly to everyone, be happy and be confident

 

Chloe: I've learnt that you just have to be yourself, don't be shy when you walk through the door, just smile and have fun!

 

Watch their interview here:

 


Bettina Stories; Hollie Macdonald

Wednesday, August 24, 2016

Being the mother or father of a mini-model can be fun, challenging, daunting and exciting all at the same time! As it is so important for the little ones to feel at their best so they can perform well - it is often up to the parent or guardian to keep it all together, with a smile! Screen Shot 2015-11-12 at 3.12.36 pm

Debra is the mum of one of our brightest stars & Seed Kids regular, Hollie, and she is certainly experienced in all aspects of the children's modelling industry now, but she recently gave us an insight on what the journey has been like from her perspective.

 

Age: 4yrs

Signed: 2014

Clients: Seed Kids, Pure Baby Organic

 

What was it like taking Hollie to her first casting?

Taking Hollie to her first casting, for me personally was actually quite nerve racking! But when we got there, we found it was all fine and everyone was quite relaxed.

 

Screen Shot 2015-11-12 at 3.12.29 pmWhat did you look for when deciding on an agency for Hollie?

We were looking for an agency that would treat Hollie with respect, and put her out there to get as much work as possible.

 

What is the best part of seeing Hollie work on set?

The best part is seeing the enjoyment she gets out of it. She's very happy on set and everybody loves her! She doesn't even know she's getting paid for it....

 

What is it like see Hollie in catalogues?

Seeing her photographs in the catalogues makes us very proud actually. It makes us very very happy!

 

Watch her interview here:

 


Bettina Stories; Harry Durand

Wednesday, August 24, 2016

 

It's not often that a 13-year-old already has nearly 10 years experience working in a particular industry, but it is certainly the case with our Harry!

Harry joined us when he was 4 years old, he was a cheeky and adorable little boy whose infectious smile won our clients over instantly. At 13 years old he still has that same smile, but has grown up into an intelligent, humble and mature young man!

We recently sat down with him to have a chat about his experience working in the entertainment industry and what he hopes for the future.

 

Age: 13yrs

Signed: 2007

Clients: Target (print & TV), Just Jeans, Myer, Westfield, Bardot, Dimmeys, Russell Athletics, Emirates Spring Racing Carnival, Lincraft, Offspring TVS, Bossini, Loreal Fashion Week, Childhoods End TVS, The Entertainment Book and many more!

 

Harry Durand_Target_Nov15(3)How long have you been with the agency?

I've been with the agency since I was 4 years old, so nine years!

 

What was your first job?

My first job was working for Westfield, it was a massive catwalk with a lot of kids

 

What has been your favourite job so far?

My favourite job so far was working as the Emirates Ambassador at the Spring Racing Carnival because I got to miss three days of school, which was awesome! I got to go to Fashions on the Field and my family were also featured in the newspaper for that which was pretty exciting.

 

Harry - Just Jeans 4What is your dream job?

I definitely want to get into more acting roles now, so would love to start doing some TV work.

 

What things have you learnt from working in the modelling industry?

I've learnt to be confident, because if you're confident you're obviously going to get a good shot and most likely to be chosen for a catalogue.

 

Do you have any tips for new kids entering the industry?

You have to be passionate in everything you do, and be happy while you're doing it! That's the most important thing.

 

 

 

Watch his interview here:


 

What Really Happens on Set? - Part 2

Tuesday, August 18, 2015

Part 2: On the Job!

 

So the day on set has finally arrived, no doubt you are feeling excited, but maybe a little nervous! Here are a few tips to get you through the nerves and into feeling confident and ready to tackle your first job.

 

You should plan to arrive approximately 10-15 minutes before your call time and find the contact person as listed for you on the call sheet or booking confirmation. Occasionally the production can be running behind schedule and you could be asked to wait. This is when the colouring books or iPad's come in handy! Other times the production crew will be ready and waiting for you and your child.

 

There are usually lots of people on set who keep production going behind the scenes and they are usually set-up in separate trailers a short distance away from the actual set so not to interrupt any filming in progress with noise or movement.

 

You will be introduced to the location nurse who is there to look after the wellbeing of underage talent by making sure they are safe, taking breaks at allocated times and have something to eat and drink. Your contact person will also make sure that someone from the ‘Wardrobe’ or ‘Costume’ department knows that you have arrived. They will either choose from the outfits you brought by request or have items ready to try on. Parents can help their child get dressed if necessary. On some shoots, children might also be required to go through ‘Hair and Make-up’. In general minimal make-up will be applied and sometimes none at all for children.

 

Soon it will be time to make your way to the actual set for filming. With younger children, parents are always allowed to stay close by or within sight, but it is important to be aware of your surroundings and not get in anyones way.

 

Here are a few general rules when on set:

  • Make sure you turn your phone off!
  • Do not talk or move around once the director calls ACTION until after they have called CUT.
  • Do not try and tell your child what to do from the sidelines. Let the director (or whoever is working with them) direct your child.

 

If you do have any questions or concerns, speak to the person who has been assigned to look after you and your child on set.

Your child may film everything that is required for the day in one go or there might be a few breaks when you will be looking after them and need to keep them occupied. Snacks are often supplied and if filming has been scheduled over a meal time then you might both sit down with cast and crew and enjoy the Catering on location.

When your child has finished work (often referred to as being ‘wrapped’) the crew person in charge will let you know and you will need to sign out for the day. Take note of the time you have finished so you can let our casting department know.

Once you have been told you can leave, collect all of your belongings and be sure to thank the crew and the people who have looked after you.


Here are a few additional tips:

Be positive! It’s nice for the crew to have someone around who is happy, easy going and helps make the day run smoothly, and they may be more likely to ask you and your child back for future projects.

Try to stay away from gossip about agents/money/other people in the industry. This can reflect badly on yourself, your child or your agency.

Try not to bring any extra siblings or family members on set.

HAVE FUN! Enjoy the experience!

What Really Happens On Set?

Friday, April 17, 2015

Part 1: Preparing for the big day

Congratulations! Your child has finally gotten a job and now you need to know everything about your day on set so that it can be a wonderful experience for both of you.

Your agent will have confirmed the job and sent you a CALL SHEET as soon as it is available to them. Some productions are very busy and cannot confirm the details until late on the day before you are required on set, but be assured that your agent will send you the necessary information as soon as they receive it.

The most important details for you to take note of are;

  • your CALL TIME (the time you are required on set)
  • the exact LOCATION that you need to be at (sometimes this is a building address, but it could be a park or other public place)
  • the CONTACT PERSON you are required to meet on the day (eg. in the case of extras for a television show this would be the name and phone number of the 3rd AD). You will also be given details of anything you are required to bring with you and how long you are expected to be needed for.



Research the location you are required to be at before you have to leave home. Sometimes the call sheet will provide you with instructions regarding parking and other times you will need to figure it out yourself.

Productions are busy and very costly, so it is important that you arrive at the time you have been called for so not to delay the shoot time or halt production. Arriving 10-15 minutes early is appreciated, but do not show up any earlier than this. If you arrive too early at location, take the time to relax rather than turning up and risking being in the way before production is ready for you.

Spending time with your child onset can be a great experience, but arriving unprepared can add a lot of the wrong type of drama to the day. Make sure you have any paperwork or items you have been asked to bring, but don’t take it personally if they don’t use it on the day. It happens often that they ask for items or information, just to change what they originally planned on the day and not ask for it or use it at all.

Depending on the job, clothes will be provided while you may be asked to supply your own outfits at other times. If you are required to bring clothes the wardrobe department will inform you of what is needed; often simple things like jeans, t-shirts and runners. In general, choose items that do not have any visible branding and bring a few options of each. Bright colours are often appreciated, unless told otherwise and avoid stripes as these can often bleed together and not look good on camera. Bring as many options as you think will be helpful and remember you can ask our casting department if you are uncertain about anything!

Taking some snacks with you can also save the day. The break times for meals on set can vary a lot from your usual times so have something handy to keep your child (and you!) functioning if that is the case. Catering on sets can be amazing and might be one of the highlights of your day, but it is not guaranteed that your child will like what is provided. Some productions regularly cater for children and may have an array of choices for them while others are used to looking after their adult actors and crew and may not have the things your child prefers to eat.

It is also a good idea to take toys or games to keep your child occupied, as you could be required to wait for extended periods of time before or during filming. The idea is to provide them with enough stimulation to keep them occupied, but ready to work when they are called on set.

Now you’re ready to go!

Glossary:

CALL SHEET: a document that your agent will send you from the production company, usually on the day before your job. It specifies what time you are required on set, how long you are expected to be needed for, the location you are to meet at, the name and phone number of the person you need to meet on set (or contact if you have any problems on the day) and other details .

CALL TIME: the time at which you are required to be on set. Always arrive at the location earlier than this and aim to find the person you are required to meet with 10-15 minutes before your call time.

3rd AD: 3rd Assistant Director. This is the person who is usually in charge of the extras on a television set and who you would be required to report to if that was your role for the day. For other jobs you might be asked to report to someone with a different role.

What Really Happens On Set? Part 2, will explore what happens once you arrive on the big day

It's Friday, what better day to check out our five fun facts about the talent industry!

1. Talent often work to set hours, ensuring their wellbeing is taken care of at all times. For example, in the state of Victoria children working in TV and Film under the age of 3 can only work a maximum of 4 hours per day. Breaks are also given at regular intervals to ensure stars don't over do it.

2. If talent are selected to work on a TV series, Film or project for an extended period of times tutors will be hired to teach on set so their learning never stops! So sorry kids, no getting out of school :)

3. The principal may have to approve talent's absence from school so kids can go be stars! This ensures they know what the kids are up to during school hours and can ensures their schooling is always a top priority.

4. If talent live far away or are under a particular age travel time to the location will be taken into consideration. This ensures talent will be booked into hotels so they can wake up fresh and ready to go for the next day!

5. For younger talent, employers will try to schedule shots around their sleep times, and often a nurse will be present on set to assist with younger children. So, as a parent support is always within hands reach for you.

Lights, camera, safety! It's all about creating a safe, supportive and positive working experience for children in the entertainment industry.



We hope you enjoyed this little insight into the talent industry and if you have any suggestions for future blogs, shoot us an email at emma@bettina.com.au